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that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
is to technology. tracy: eight hours is essentially new york to key west. lori: i would go like every friday. a christmas outage left millions of users without users streaming netflix. shibani joshi with this christmas debacle next. tracy: washington cannot agree on a plan for the fiscal cliff. we go to the nation's capital after break. let's take a look at how the dollar is faring against foreign currencies as we head to break. ♪ with fidelity's new options platform, we've completely integrated every step of the process, making it easier to try filters and strategies... to get a list of equity option.. evaluate them with our p&l calculator... and execute faster with our more intuitive trade ticket. i'm greg stevens and i helped create fidelity's options platform. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. lori: the senate returns to washington tomorrow. with just five days to address the dreaded fiscal cliff. peter barnes is live in d.c. with the very latest. peter: everyone looking to leader harry reid and th
upgrades to the car itself in terms of the engine. there need to be technology upgrades keep prices down not there yet. grocery and grain. a lot of folks going to be the grocery store are going to notice these things. what particular products. >> talked about the milk cliff that's something that's certainly a risk this year just because of the fiscal cliff and could see milk prices more than double. but just because of the drought this year. we're seeing prices for a lot of things go up. obviously grains being a big one but then you think about all of the animals that eat grains and then that makes meat prices go up. dairy. and then that trickles down into all sorts of processed food. this is something we see almost every year. some of the experts we talked to said they are seeing potentially smaller increases that's settling out. still about 6% next year. >> clayton: in the tech field we are going to see some things going up as well. high end televisions. home theater systems and computers set to go up as well? >> always something new coming out. starting to see the roll out of ultra hi
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, known as stem, to make sure that we are bringing thoseoung minds with the creativity and t engineering background to create the economies for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of our economy, and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and ensuring the long-term future of nasa, an essential generator for our economy. ensuring that stay-at-home moms and dads who work so hard raising childre and contributing to the community have spousal ira's to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard deduction are just a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate, and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into the greatest nation on earth will be protected so that future generations will have the same opportunities that we have had in this great country and that our forebearers sacrificed so much
experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. comfort individualized. save 50% on the final closeout of our silver limited edition bed plus special financing through new years day. >>> here's this morning's key question. how will a failure in the fiscal cliff negotiations hit you at home? with you now is jean. let me give you my three economic indicators. >> okay. >> guinness, harp and bass don't count. >> i said three. those are four and five. the top three are, one, if you can find a space, parking space in a shopping mall. >> easy to do these days. >> two, grocery store lines. check out what kind of food people are buy. if they're buying high-end items in the grocery line. and three, lottery tickets and people ahead of you are buying lottery tickets, if they're buying a lot of $2 tickets it means we're in a funk. >> we're in a funk. the folks at bank rate did
. >> everything lives forever in technology. it does. >> it doesn't. >> it will be interesting to see on the next reading on users if users come back, because instagram denounced what they're going to do with the photos. >> it's amazing how one lawyer, one draft had such a big affect. >> exactly. >>> markets are set to decline sharply at the open. how do you prepare for today's session? we'll get the word from the street, that is next. and jim paulson tells us why he's expecting a 15 to 20% gain for the s&p 500 in 2013. looks like we're going to lose 10.5 on the s&p right at the open. more "squawk on the street," right ahead. p for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like liberty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people
room than corolla and civic? and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation and other handy stuff? yeahthat would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169-per-month lease on a 2013 nissan sentra. ♪ >>. >> gregg: a florida family's nightmare is finally over. john hammer is back on american soil after spending months inside a mexican prison. he was arrested trying to carry a heirloom shotgun across the border. dominic is live in los angeles with more on the story. >> reporter: i think that image is john hammer chained like a dog to his bunk. looking like he was going to languish there for many more months. mexican authorities released home friday. he is driving across the country to his home in florida. they are expected to arrive christmas eve. he spent the night in brownville texas across the border where he was being held. during his detention he received threats from drug cartel members. his mother described to fox news that john was really sick at the moment with a cuff and may need m
's sale. help protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >> rick: time for your shot of the morning. a husky that went missing nine months ago in phoenix finally reunited with its owner. a woman found contain more than 1,000 miles away in oregon running near a busy highway. a local humane society tracked down cane's owner by using his identity chip. that is a nice christmas gift if you get your pooch
this technology in the sky. general, how is he doing this morning? i know you've been tracking him early, just a few minutes ago you started, right? >> good morning. it's a pleasure to be on. we started about two hours ago and we're off to a great start. santa is in fine form. he's on his task. lots of presents have been given out. like i said, we're off to a great start. >> clayton: so i understand if we put up some of the results that apparently he left the north pole a little while ago. he's over australia and guam at this hour. when is he projected to make landfall here in the united states? do you have any indication or idea about that, if the kids are wondering? >> sure. we can project that. of course, there will be changes enroute. santa is a little unpredictable, but we know for sure he's going to get the mission done. we expect he'll be over the east coast starting at about 9:00 p.m. this evening and he'll be over the united states in general between 9 and midnight tonight. >> clayton: i understand, i was looking at some history of this and how norad got started tracking santa. am i
made necessary by new technology. but congress has failed to do this. some court rulings have likewise fallen short of protecting the full scope -- the full spirit of the fourth amendment as it applies to our world of complex data sharing. courts have attempted in good faith to determine whether individuals have a reasonable expectation of privacy in different kinds of information that they might share to third parties, sometimes online. but the result of many of these rulings is a varied and unpredictable legal landscape in which many don't know and can't figure out whether they can rely on the fourth amendment to protect sensitive information that they routinely share with others for a limited business purpose. congress needs to act to preserve the fourth amendment's protections as they apply to everyday uses including routine use of the internet, use of credit cards, libraries and banks. absent such protections, individuals may in time grow weary of sharing information with third parties. i'm cognizant that this area of the law is complex. it's full of changes and full of instances
of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you
, they have this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity and is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes before the below the federal poverty level -- below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- , corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: spat and island, extension -- step and island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and r hinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i am one point to make their. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, i
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17